EXTRACT FROM BAYSIDE TREE PLANTING STRATEGY: DECEMBER 1997

J. GOLF COURSES 

Theme 

The Urban Character Study characterises the area as having: 

"There is a density of vegetation around this area that blends together well the uses of residential, commercial and recreational" and 

"Street trees are more exotic than native, with the Golf Course giving an impression of dense vegetation. " 

and recommends in general terms: 

"Where there are old established street trees in good condition, they are to remain at all costs." 

"Where there is an established avenue of tree planting this should be retained." 

"The Golf Course 'rural feel' should be maintained." 

"Protect and promote large scale landscaping and open space that define districts and topography."

The best streetscapes in this area are dominated by native plantings. Existing exotic trees (eg Claret Ash (Fraxinus 'Raywoodi')) are recommended for replacement by better performing natives. Eucalypts figure prominently. Where exotics are important they are often evergreen, such as the Cypress plantings along many golf course edges. Maintenance of 'the rural feel', as recommended by the Urban Character Study, will be best achieved by an emphasis on natives in future street tree planting. Where exotic trees presently make a significant contribution to a high rating street, retention of those species is recommended. 

  

General observations 

  • Many streetscapes enhanced by proximity to park and golf course planting.
  • Paths and kerbs are uniformly concrete.
  • Many vacant planting sites.
  • Trees small and mixed, often having little impact.
  • Lilly-pillys (Acmena spp.), Narrow leaf Peppermint (Eucalyptus nicholii), and Golden

Ash (Fraxinus excelsior "Aurea") are among the trees doing well. 

  

Landscape Amenity Ratings 

Golf Courses had an average score of 2.67 for Rating 1, approximating the Council wide average of 2.67. Some Golf Course streets (27%) were determined to have less than satisfactory landscape quality. 
  

Significant trees (Public Land) 
  

Street Address 

Species Name 

Common Name

No.

Location 

Comas Road 

Angophora costata

Smooth-barked Myrtle

1

2 Comas Road 

Wall Street

Eucalyptus ficifolia

Flowering Gum

1

6 Wall Street

 

Bayside Street Tree Planting Strategy (December 1997)                                                                                                                  Page 65

 

Significant Streetscapes 

Street                                     Recommended Actions 

Cheltenham Road                 Extend tall mixed Eucalypt plantings on south side. Progressively refine 
Reserve Rd (to the               character of road plantings to contain only local natives. 
start of formal 
naturestrips

Garnet-Leary Avenue          Maintain Eucalyptus nicholii avenue. 

St Andrews Court                Maintain alternating avenue of Iron Bark (Eucalyptus sideroxylon) and 
                                           Banksia integrifolia. 

Stevens Parade                    Maintain Eucalyptus nicholii avenue. 

Sydney Street                       Extend Lilly-pilly avenue planting. 

Victor Avenue                     Extend E. leucoxylon avenue theme. 

 Priority 1 
Glamis Street 
Lilian Court 
Oakley Street
 

Priority 2 
Monaco Crescent
 
Wall Street 
 

Bayside Street Tree Planting Strategy (December 1997)                                                                                                                  Page 66

 

Recommended street trees:

Key: UP = This species has been identified as coping well with being pruned

around powerlines.

C = This species has been identified as coping with coastal

conditions either located on the front line or second line

I = Trees Indigenous to the Bayside area.(Seed is collected from remnant

trees in Bayside).

Large Canopy (15 metres plus), (Nature strips 3 metres plus)

Exotic

Quercus robur (Infill only)

Ulmus glabra 'Lutescens(Infill only)

Native

Acacia melonoxylon I

Angophora costata C

Angophora floribunda C

Eucalyptus camaldulensis I

E. maculata C

E. melliodora

E. microcarpa

E. polyanthemos

E. rubida

E. saligna C

E. tereticornis C

Melaleuca leucadendron

M. quinquinervia C

Medium Canopy (to 10 - 12 metres) (Nature strips 1.5 - 3 metres)

Exotic

Acer negundo (Infill only)

Cinnamomum camphora (Infill only)

Elaeocarpus reticulatus

Liquidambar styraciflua (Infill only)

Native

Acacia decurrens

A. mearnsii

A. pendula

Allocasurina torulosa C

Agonis flexuosa - UP

Banksia integrifolia I C

B. serrata C

Eucalyptus cephalocarpa

E. cinera

E. cornuta C

E. crenulata

E. ficifolia C

E. largiflorens

E. leucoxylon var. megalocarpa UP C

E. mannifera ssp. maculosa

E. nicholii UP

E. ovata I C

E. pauciflora I

E. polyanthemos

E. pryoriana I C

E. pulchella

E. radiata

E. salubris

E. scoparia

E. sideroxylon 'Rosea’ C

E. species

Ficus hilli

Lophostemon confertus UP

Tristaniopsis laurina

Waterhousia floribunda

Small Canopy (to 8 metres NOT REQUIRING POWERLINE CLEARANCE)

(Nature strips up to 1.5 metres)

Native

Acacia acuminata

A. cognata

A. implexa I

A. podalrifolia C

A. pycnantha C

Acmena smithii

A. torulosa C

A. verticillata I C

Angophora hispida C

Banksia marginata C

B. prionotes C

B. serrata C

Brachychiton rupestris

Callistemon 'Dawson River Weeper’

C 'Harkness' C

C. salignus C

C. viminalis C

Eucalyptus erythrocorys C

E. forestiana

E. spathulata

E. steedmani

E. torquata

E. woodwardii

E. species

Griselina littoralis

Hakea corriacea C

Hakea species C

Leptospermum laevigatum I C

L. species

Melia azedarach

Melaleuca bracteata

M. linariifolia C

M. quinquenervia

Persoonia pinifolia

Arrangement

Plantings shall be arranged as formal avenues or informal groves of the recommended species where appropriate. Spacings shall depend on species used, but may range from 2 to 15 metres.

Courts or "No Through Road" streets may be treated as individual landscape treatments, each with their own particular style. Species used in terminating the end of the street or court bowl should be consistent with those at the entrance, with species from the character area providing the type of planting theme.

Street orientation and therefore solar access to homes on the south side of east/west streets should be considered in each particular street to
determine the species of street tree to be planted.

Commercial Areas

Most commercial or shopping precincts within Bayside are poorly planted, with consequent reduced pedestrian amenity. These areas warrant detailed design attention, but should identify with the themes established in the relevant character area.

Large Canopy Trees

  • Streets where the grassed nature strips exceed 3.0 metres, street width is at least 20 metres, and where no high voltage powerlines exist overhead.
  • Site specific opportunities for large trees associated with traffic medians, kerb outstands or other roadway treatments.
  • Threshold treatments at street intersections.

Medium Canopy Trees

  • Use as the primary street tree in streets where the grassed naturestrip exceeds 1.5 metres in width.

Small Canopy Trees

  • Streets where the grassed naturestrips are less than 1.5 metres or street width is less than 15 metres.
  • Used as major tree in plantings which incorporate large or medium canopy trees as threshold or accent plantings.
  • Site specific opportunities where large or medium canopy trees cannot be accommodated.

 

K. BEAUMARIS [Map defines this as all of Beaumaris except Golf Links area & area west of Reserve Road]

Theme

The Urban Character Study characterises the area as having:

"Substantive vegetation throughout, including private front gardens overwhelmingly well landscaped features and character, ie., trees."

and recommends in general terms:

  • "Where there are old established street trees in good condition, they are to remain at all costs. "
  • "Where there is an established avenue of tree planting this should be retained.

The Urban Character Study notes, among other things, the "native street trees" and the "very Australian" character of Beaumaris streetscapes.
Generally, the best streetscapes are evergreen and dominated by mixed native plantings. Many of the large private frontage landscapes include
substantial Eucalyptus sp, often Lemon Scented Gum (Eucalyptus citriodora). A predominantly evergreen native feel is recommended for future
street tree planting in this precinct.

 

General observations

  • Footpaths and kerbs uniformly concrete.
  • Many large trees on private frontages making a positive contribution to the streetscape.
  • Strong Eucalypt character common, reinforced by large Eucalypts on private frontages.

 

Landscape Amenity Ratings

Beaumaris had an average score of 2.78 for Rating 1, above the Council wide average of 2.67. A number of streets in Beaumaris were determined
to have high quality (25%), with only 14% having a less than satisfactory landscape quality. Beaumaris is clearly among the areas with the highest overall streetscape amenity in Bayside.

 

Significant trees (Public Land)

Street Address Species Name CommonName No. Location

Martin Street Leptospermum Coast Tea Tree 1 Near entrance to the

laevigatum Beaumaris Bowling

Club

Significant Streetscapes

 

Street Recommended Actions

Coles Court Maintain current Kanooka (Tristaniopsis laurina) avenue.

Coreen Avenue Continue planting Allocasuarina torulosa and Melaleuca linariifolia.

Margate Street Strengthen Brush Box (Lophostemon confertus) planting to create avenue.

Scarborough Grove Continue Melaleuca theme planting Melaleuca linariifolia.

Wells Road Plant Melaleuca linariifolia from Balcombe Road to Illaroo Reserve and

Agonis flexuosa from Beach Road north.

Priority 1

East Concourse

Hugo Street

North Concourse

South Concourse

Priority 2

Keys Street

Recommended street trees:

Key: UP = This species has been identified as coping well with being pruned

around powerlines.

C = This species has been identified as coping with coastal

conditions either located on the front line or second line

I = Trees Indigenous to the Bayside area.(Seed is collected from remnant

trees in Bayside).

Large Canopy (15 metres plus), (Nature strips 3 metres plus)

Native

Acacia melonoxylon I

Angophora costata C

Angophora floribunda C

Eucalyptus camaldulensis I

E. maculata C

E. melliodora

E. tereticornis C

M. quinquinervia C

Medium Canopy (to 10 - 12 metres)(Nature strips 1.5 - 3 metres)

Exotic

Acer negundo (Infill only)

Cinnamomum camphora (Infill only)

Fraxinus excelsior 'A rea' (Infill only

Liquidambar styrac@flua (Infill only)

Native

A. implexa I

A. mearnsii

Allocasuarina torulosa C

Agonisflexuosa - UP

Banksia integrifolia I C

B. serrata C

Eucalyptus cinera

E. ficifolia C

E. leucoxylon var. megalocarpa UP C

E. nicholii UP

E. ovata I C

E. pauciflora I

E. pryoriana I C

E. pulchella

E. radiata

E. scoparia

E. sideroxylon 'Rosea' C

E. species

Lophostemon confertus UP

Tristaniopsis laurina

Waterhousia floribunda

Small Canopy (to 8 metres NOT REQUIRING POWERLINE CLEARANCE) (Nature strips up to 1.5 metres)

Native

Acacia implexa I

A. podalrifolia C

A. pycnantha C

Aemena smithii

Allocasuarina littoralis I C

A. torulosa C

A. verticillata I C

Angophora hispida C

Banksia marginate C

B. prionotes C

B. serrata C

Callistemon 'Dawson River Weeper’

C. 'HarknessC

C. salignus C

C. viminalis C

Eucalyptus erythrocorys C

E. forestiana

E. torquata

E. species

Hakea corriacea C

Hakea species C

Leptospermum laevigatum I C

L. species

Melaleuca bracteata

M. linariifolia C (Infill only)

M. quinquenervia

Arrangement

Plantings shall be arranged as formal avenues or informal groves of the recommended species where appropriate. Spacings shall depend on species used,
but may range from 2 to 15 metres.

Courts or "No Through Road" streets may be treated as individual landscape treatments, each with their own particular style. Species used in terminating
the end of the street or court bowl should be consistent with those at the entrance, with species from the character area providing the type of planting theme.

Street orientation is not considered a major issue in Beaumaris as most private frontages throughout the study area are already well planted, as well as
reasonably large. Solar access to homes on the south side of east/west streets is therefore not seen as a determinant of the species of street tree to be planted.

Coastal Areas

Special consideration should be given to landscape treatments of streets which terminate near the Bay. Issues to be addressed in each location include:

  • sightlines to the Bay
  • the impact of salt spray on the vegetation planted
  • the role this vegetation plays in linking the foreshore landscape to the street treescape should be considered before detailed recommendations for
  • street and coastal planting are prepared. An indication is given in the text above, for precincts with a coastal edge, as to where consideration of
  • coastal planting should start.

Commercial Areas

Most commercial or shopping precincts within Bayside are poorly planted, with consequent reduced pedestrian amenity. These areas warrant detailed
design attention, but should identify with the themes established in the relevant character area.

Large Canopy Trees

  • Streets where the grassed naturestrips exceed 3.0 metres, street width is at least 20 metres, and where no high voltage powerlines exist overhead.
  • Site specific opportunities for large trees associated with traffic medians, kerb outstands or other roadway treatments.
  • Threshold treatments at street intersections.

Medium Canopy Trees

  • Use as the primary street tree in streets where the grassed naturestrip exceeds 1.5 metres in wi 'dth.

Small Canopy Trees

  • Streets where the grassed naturestrips are less than 1.5 metres or street width is less than 15 metres.
  • Used as major tree in plantings that incorporate large or medium canopy trees as threshold or accent plantings.
  • Site specific opportunities where large or medium canopy trees cannot be accommodated.

 

L. BLACK ROCK [Map defines this, strangely, as including all that part of Beaumaris west of Reserve Road!]

Theme

The Urban Character Study characterises the area as having: "Native vegetation is dominant." and recommends in general terms:

  • "Where there are old established street trees in good condition, they are to remain at all costs."
  • "Where there is an established avenue of tree planting this should be retained.
  • "Indigenous vegetation to be protected."

An emphasis on the use of indigenous and native species in future street tree plantings will enhance the already strong character of this area.

General observations

  • Mainly concrete footpaths and kerbs.
  • Many vacant sites
  • Red Flowering Gum (Eucalyptus ficifolia) and Brush Box (Lophostemon confertus) doing well.

 

Landscape Amenity Ratings

Black Rock had an average score of 2.44 for Rating 1, below the Council wide average of 2.67. Some Black Rock streets (27%) were
determined to have less than satisfactory landscape quality.

 

Significant trees (Public Land)

Street Address Species Name Common Name No. Location

Ardoyne Street Eucalyptus ficifolia Flowering Gum 1 40 Ardoyne Street

Ebden Avenue Ficus macrophylla Moreton Bay Fig 1 Black Rock House, Ebden Avenue,

Black Rock

Haydens Road Angophora costata Smooth-bark Apple 2 485 Balcombe Road in

Myrtle Haydens Rd.

Third Street Eucalyptus Lemon-scented 1 21 Central Avenue in

citriodora Gum Third Street.

Significant Streetscapes

Street Recommended Actions

Ardoyne Street Continue planting Eucalyptus ficifolia.

Arranmore Avenue Continue with Brush Box avenue.

Point Avenue Continue coastal planting theme of mixed Banksia and Coastal Tea tree.

Priority 1

Bruce Street

Hepburn Avenue

Links Street

Page Street

Priority 2

Nil.

Recommended street trees:

Key: UP = This species has been identified as coping well with being pruned around powerlines.

C = This species has been identified as coping with coastal conditions either located on the front line or second line

I = Trees Indigenous to the Bayside area.(Seed is collected from remnant trees in Bayside).

Large Canopy (15 metres plus), (Nature strips 3 metres plus)

Native

Acacia melonoxylon I

Angophora costata C

Angophora floribunda C

Eucalyptus camaldulensis I

E. maculata C

E. melliodora

E. tereticornis C

M. quinquinervia C

Medium Canopy (to 10 - 12 metres) (Nature strips 1.5 - 3 metres)

Exotic

Acer negundo (Infill only)

Cinnamomum camphora (Infill only)

Fraxinus excelsior 'Aurea' (Infill only)

Liquidambar styraciflua (Infill only)

Native

A. implexa I

A. mearnsii

Allocasurina torulosa C

Agonis flexuosa - UP

Banksia integrifolia I C

B. serrata C

Eucalyptus cinera

E. ficifolia C

E. leucoxylon var. megalocarpa UP C

E. nicholii UP

E. ovata I C

E. pauciflora I

E. pryoriana I C

E. pulchella

E. radiata

E. scoparia

E. sideroxylon 'Rosea' C

E. species

Lophostemon confertus UP

Tristaniopsis laurina

Waterhousiafloribunda

Small Canopy (to 8 metres NOT REQUIRING POWERLINE CLEARANCE)

(Nature strips up to 1.5 metres)

Native

Acacia implexa I

A. podalrifolia C

A. pycnantha C

Acmena smithii

Allocasurina littoralis I C

A. torulosa C

A. verticillata I C

Angophora hispida C

Banksia marginate C

B. prionotes C

B. serrata C

Callistemon 'Dawson River Weeper’

C. 'Harkness' C

C. salignus C

C. viminalis C

Eucalyptus erythrocorys C

E. forestiana

E. torquata

E. species

Hakea corriacea C

Hakea species C

Leptospermum laevigatum I C

L. species

Melaleuca bracteata

M. linariifolia C (Infill only)

M. quinquenervia

Arrangement

In non-coastal areas, street trees shall be arranged as formal avenues of the recommended species. In these circumstances, it is anticipated that
the minimum spacing will be 8 metres, with maximum spacing of 15 metres.

Coastal areas may be planted as formal avenues or informal groves where appropriate. Spacings shall depend on species used, but may range
from 2 to 15 metres.

Courts or "No Through Road" streets may be treated as individual landscape treatments, each with their own particular style. Species used in
terminating the end of the street or court bowl should be consistent with those at the entrance, with species from the character area providing
the type of planting theme.

Street orientation is not considered a major issue in Black Rock as most private frontages throughout the study area are already well planted,
as well as reasonably large. Solar access to homes on the south side of east/west streets is therefore not seen as a determinant of the species
of street tree to be planted.

Coastal Areas

Special consideration should be given to landscape treatments of streets that terminate near the Bay. Issues to be addressed in each location
include:

  • sightlines to the Bay
  • the impact of salt spray on the vegetation planted
  • the role this vegetation plays in linking the foreshore landscape to the street treescape should be considered before detailed
  • recommendations for street and coastal planting are prepared. An indication is given in the text above, for precincts with a
  • coastal edge, as to where consideration of coastal planting should start.

Commercial Areas

Most commercial or shopping precincts within Bayside are poorly planted, with consequent reduced pedestrian amenity. These areas
warrant detailed design attention, but should identify with the themes established in the relevant character area.

Large Canopy Trees

  • Streets where the grassed naturestrips exceed 3.0 metres, street width is at least 20 metres, and where no high voltage powerlines
  • exist overhead.
  • Site specific opportunities for large trees associated with traffic medians, kerb outstands or other roadway treatments.
  • Threshold treatments at street intersections.

Medium Canopy Trees

  • Use as the primary street tree in streets where the grassed naturestrip exceeds 1.5 metres in width.

Small Canopy Trees

  • Streets where the grassed naturestrips are less than 1.5 metres or street width is less than 15 metres.
  • Used as major tree in plantings that incorporate large or medium canopy trees as threshold or accent plantings.
  • Site specific opportunities where large or medium canopy trees cannot be accommodated.

 

M. KEY STREETS

Within Bayside there is a hierarchy of road types. This is due to several factors including:

  • the physical length and width of the road
  • the amount of traffic using the road
  • location in the municipality ie: main thoroughfare or feeder road from a thoroughfare.

These streets also act as gateways to the municipality providing commuters with a 'snapshot' of the areas character. Some of these key streets are found
in more than one character area of Bayside and therefore need to be treated in a different way when tree planting is considered.

Accordingly these streets are considered separately as 'Key Streets' in this strategy and are identified for priority attention. This "Key Streets" program
should focus on the following streets:

In general 'Key Streets' include highway's, major and secondary arterial roads and collector roads. Recommended actions for 'Key Streets' in the Bayside
area is as follows:

1. Nepean Highway

Council has no role in the ongoing management or planning for landscape character along Nepean Highway. This area is under VicRoads duristiction.
Council should lobby VicRoads to implement a consistent planting theme along Nepean Highway to improve its visual amenity.

2. North Road

The Urban Character study indicates that:

"North Road is a grand avenue with established mature and substantial street trees. "Deep 'frontage " private gardens provide a wide, very leafy
streetscape which is "attractive".

"Large mature trees dominate streetscape".

"Generally wide and deep frontages with established gardens, with wide nature strips.

"Street trees, in places, are fragile."

and recommends in general terms to:

"Safeguard existing mature trees."

"Maintain existing building setbacks to provide a strong (vegetated) landscaped setting."

"Prepare comprehensive street tree inventory, and management plan, including replanting schedules."

"Prohibit tree removal to private properties."

"Promote undergrounding of services, or at a minimum, bundle overhead cables."

The recommendations are:

Street Recommended Actions

North Road (Nepean Extend unique theme of Pines (Pinus pinaster) and Elms (Ulmus

Hwy to the Foreshore) procera) along this section of North Road.

North Road In conjunction with the City of Glen Eira and VicRoads continue

Hawthorn Road to planting Golden Ash (Fraxinus excelsior "Aurea").

Nepean Hwy)

North Road Plant a Eucalyptus sp, that will complement the strong avenue in the

(Hawthorn Road to central median of Spotted Gum (Eucalyptus maculata).

Thomas Street)

 

3. Other 'Key Streets'

 

St. Kilda Street Continue planting Plane trees using Platanus 'Autumn Glory'. Planting on the east side
of St Kilda St should be of the same species however at 50 metre intervals so as views into the
parkland / golf course are relatively unaffected.

New Street Plant vacant sites with Platanus 'Autumn Glory' eventually replacing all other species.
Work to be instituted on an as required basis.

Cochrane Street Continue avenue of Queensland Brush Box (Lophostemon confertus).

(North of North Rd)

Cochrane Street Establish an avenue of Platanus 'Autumn Glory'.

(South of North Rd)

The Esplanade Due to high traffic flow, narrow naturestrips and the requirement by residents for unimpeded views over the Bay, street trees should not be planted along the Esplanade. Vegetation from private gardens and the foreshore reserve are the major sources of positive visual amenity.

Martin Street Maintain Golden Ash (Fraxinus excelsior "Aurea ") avenue.

Gardenvale Strip

Shopping Precinct

(Hamilton to Nepean)

Martin Street Strengthen existing avenue of Planes trees.

(St Kilda St to

Hamilton)

Martin Street Remove Tamarisk, west of the existing Elm trees, and plant a species that

(St.Kilda St to the links the foreshore with this group of Elms.

foreshore)

Bay Street Extend avenue of Golden Elm (Ulmus glabra 'Lutescens’) from the shopping precinct throughout Bay St.

Union Street (Nepean Extend avenue of Liquidambar (Liquidambar stracyflua).

Hwy to Hawthorn Rd)

Hawthorn Road Tree planting outside residences is to be Red Maple (Acer rilbrum). Shopping precincts have there own species.

Thomas Street Plant an avenue of Queensland Brush Box (Lophostemon confertus).

Centre Road Establish an avenue of Platanus 'Autumn Glory’

Hampton Street Gradually replace Ash with Cut Leaf Planes (Platanus digitata). Shopping precincts are to have their existing themes continued.

Dendy Street Establish an avenue of Scarlet Oak (Quercus coccinea).

Marriage Road Continue avenue planting of Golden Ash.

Were Street Gradually plant an avenue of Platanus 'Autumn Glory’'

South Road Extend Eucalypt theme throughout South Road

Cummins Road Due to extremely small naturestrips and high traffic flow tree planting should not be undertaken.

Beach Road Vegetation from private gardens and the foreshore reserve are the major sources of positive visual amenity. Street tree planting should not be undertaken.

Ludstone Street Plant Eucalyptus crenulata to create an avenue.

Bridge Street Continue planting Red Flowering Gum (Eucalyptusficifolia).

Highett Road Plant Eucalyptus scoparia throughout

Bay Road Extend Queensland Brush Box (Lophostemon confertus) throughout.

Bluff Road Continue planting Narrow Leaf Peppermint (Eucalyptus nicholli).

Wickham Road Establish an avenue of Cut Leaf Plane (Platanus digitata).

Reserve Road Establish an avenue of. Queensland Brush Box (Lophostemon confertus) where possible between Bay Rd & Balcombe Rd. Golf Course vegetation will prevent some plantings. Establish an avenue of Allocasuarina verticillata between Beach Rd and Balcombe Rd..

Weatherall Road Establish an avenue of Smooth Barked Apple Gum (Angophora costata).

Balcombe Road Establish an avenue of Kanooka (Tristaniopsis laurina).

Charman Road Establish an avenue of appropriate trees in conjunction with the City of Kingston).
 
Coastal Areas

Special consideration should be given to landscape treatments of streets that terminate near the Bay. Issues to be addressed in each location include:

  • sightlines to the Bay
  • the impact of salt spray on the vegetation planted
  • the role this vegetation plays in linking the foreshore landscape to the street treescape should be considered before detailed recommendations for street and coastal planting are prepared.
  • An indication is given in the text above, for precincts with a coastal edge, as to where consideration of coastal planting should start.

Commercial Areas

Most commercial or shopping precincts within Bayside are poorly planted, with consequent reduced pedestrian amenity.
These areas warrant detailed design attention, but should identify with the themes established in the relevant character area.

Industrial areas

Where the land use is industrial, special design attention is required to provide adequate planting opportunities. It is recommended that an industrial area landscape strategy be developed. Negotiation with the industrial businesses in the area will be required.

   

APPENDIX A - IMPLEMENTATION

A1 General

To ensure the overall intent of the Street Tree Planting Strategy is transposed into reality, an implementation process is required.
This process should create the desired character in each street, giving residents the opportunity to comment on species selection.

 

Implementation of street tree planting within the Strategy will be dependent on a number of factors.
Assessment of these factors will enable a particular process to be selected for implementation for each particular situation.

 

A2 Factors Affecting Street Tree Planting

 

These factors are discussed below, along with information relating to planting strategies that may be used.

 

A2.1 Existing Tree Species

The existing planting's of trees in a street will have a significant effect on the types of tree that can be planted.
The effect of these trees is dependent upon their significance in a local or regional sense, the overall health of the trees, and the species present.
On the basis of these characteristics, decisions about species selection can be made.

 

The following are situations that occur in Bayside. Species to be planted are identified for each:

 

a) Significant Streets

Existing major streetscapes of the City. Species for these streets are specifically defined in the Strategy.

 

b) Key Streets

Species as defined in the Strategy; these are the major roads running through and around the City.

 

c) Established Streets

Existing tree species have resulted from a previous Council decision, community consultation process, or as a result of the implementation of this Strategy.

 

d) Undefined Streets

These streets don't have a pre-established theme other than that defined by the relevant character theme.
They may be grouped according to existing tree species as follows:

i) Conforming - Pre-dominant species conforms to the species list in this Strategy;

ii) Non-Confonning - Pre-dominant species does not conform to the Streetscape Strategy;

iii) Unsuitable - Pre-dominant species are unsuitable as street trees and are no longer planted within the City (eg: Lagunaria patersonia); or

iv) Mixed - No pre-dominant species exists.

 

A2.2 Planting Processes

Having assessed the structure and style of the existing street trees, some decisions will be required about the process to be implemented
to facilitate the planting of any new tree(s). Where full street planting is to be undertaken any actions would usually be preceded by a consultation process.

The range of options available for most street tree planting is as follows:

 

a) Non Planting - Site conditions preclude tree planting. Other landscape options are to be canvassed.

b) Plant tree - This may result from one of the following processes;

i) Dominant - Plant the pre-dominant species in the street if it conforms with the species list for the area contained in the Strategy.

ii) Strategy - Plant the species listed within the Strategy or previous Council decision.

iii) Notify - Plant species selected from within the Strategy or previous from Council decision. Residents notified before planting.
This process will be undertaken in all streets not covered in the previous sections.

iv) Consult - Should notification to residents of the species selected cause a concern, or no clear species selection be apparent,
planting would occur only after implementation of full community consultation process.

(Note: Dominant and Strategy planting's would not require any notification or consultation, except for the supply of a brochure about the tree
and maintenance thereof after planting.

 

A2.3 Planting Style

The Strategy defines three planting styles. The styles nominated for each character area of the City will further enhance the existing landscape themes.

Each style will require a different resident approval exercise when implementing a full community consultation process.

a) Formal Avenue

These are created by the formal planting of streets as avenues of single tree species, or alternating species, at standard intervals.
This style provides a strong framework for older established areas, and long straight road reserves, and usually involves the use of exotic tree species.

Residents would be offered a choice of suitable species as defined in the Strategy. One species would be selected for planting
on the basis of the views of the majority of residents.

b) Informal Grove

The use of multiple species in a random format, both in spacings and species, is suggested for areas with a more native character.
This principle of informal spacings and species is designed to mimic the way natural bushland areas develop.

c) Landscaped

Some areas of the City require specialised attention as a result of high pedestrian or vehicular traffic (eg: shopping centres, industrial areas)
or due to their intimate nature (eg: court bowls or road closures). Specific landscape planning of these areas will provide a more
appropriate outcome than that normally implemented for other streets in the City. Residents/proprietors would be requested to approve
a specific landscape design for a street. This plan would then be implemented. This process would apply to most courts and some
specialised streets (eg: commercial and industrial areas).

 

A2.4 Priority

Each year Council provides an allocation within its budget for the planting of street trees. As with all financial resources these funds should be
spent in achieving the greatest benefits possible for the residents of the City. To enable this to be achieved, annual prioritisation will be
required to achieve this objective.

Prioritisation of all street tree planting has been undertaken as part of the development of this strategy, by the use of amenity landscape
ratings for each street in Bayside. This would ensure effective and efficient use of resources. Priority actions are as follows:

 

a) Replace whole streets identified in the Strategy as Priority 1 and 2 streets.

Existing healthy trees would normally be retained unless they were deemed to be inappropriate or causing problems.

b) Replace individual trees, resulting from resident requests or Council removals.

c) In-fill planting of Significant Streets and Key Streets identified in the Strategy, to ensure the quality and structure of these
streetscapes is retained.

  1. Remove and replace unsuitable tree species, which are causing, or may cause hazards (eg: Lagunaria patersonii).

e) Remove and replace trees in streets on lower priority listings provided in the Strategy. Resident requests for street
replacements would be a factor in determining selections for actions for similarly graded streets.

An annual listing of streets will be developed on the basis of the above priorities, and a staging program developed to enable implementation
within the framework of the Annual Plan.

A2.5 Species for Planting

The Strategy has nominated a range of tree species for each character area to enhance the existing landscape. Species are classified
as large, medium or small, depending on their ability to perform within a specified naturestrip width.

The species have been selected to ensure that they achieve the required landscape structure, whilst not creating maintenance or
safety concerns. issues such as shedding of fruit, bark and leaves, presence of thorns, prunability, mature height and growth rate
will all influence the species selected.

On the basis of the species selected, the following criteria would be considered when purchasing:

 

a) Size of plant

The initial size of the tree to be planted will depend on the type of tree selected. In general, deciduous trees are more readily available in larger sizes than evergreen species. The size of the tree is limited by the size of the rootball, and the ability to easily plant the tree in the space provided. In this instance, the location of underground and overhead services, and nature strip width are limiting factors. Further, the practicality of planting is maximised at a particular tree size, after which the cost of planting the tree becomes uneconomical.

 

b) Species Availability

Evergreen trees are generally available most of the year. However, availability of advanced specimens of many of the species nominated in the Strategy is currently limited. Deciduous trees are generally only available during the winter months. New techniques are now extending this planting period.

 

c) Overhead Electricity Wires

Where a rapidly growing large tree is to be planted (eg: Eucalyptus spp), it may be appropriate to plant a smaller species of a similar type, where overhead wires have not been changed to aerial bundled conductors (ABC) or relocated underground. This interim measure may reduce damage to trees as a result of wire clearing, and enable future planting's (post- ABC) to be implemented in harmony with interim trees.

 

APPENDIX E - STREET TREE SPECIES SUMMARY

Where the term "Infill only" is used, it is an indication that the tree is recommended only where a strong planting including that species is already present. It is not recommended as a tree for streets where a new theme is being developed.

Key: UP = This species has been identified as coping well with being pruned around powerlines.

C = This species has been identified as coping with coastal conditions either located on the front line or second line

Large Canopy (15 metres plus), (Nature strips 3 metres plus)

Exotic

Platanus cultivars UP

Quercus coccinea

Q. canariensis

Q. palustris UP

Q. robur

Schinus molle (Special situations)

Tilia platyphyllos

T cordata

Ulmus glabra 'Lutescens' UP

U. procera (Infill Only)

Native

Acacia melonoxylon I

Angophora costata C

Angophora floribunda C

Eucalyptus camaldulensis I

E. maculata C

E. melliodora

E. microcarpa

E. polyanthemos

E. rubida

E. saligna C

E. tereticornis C

Melaleuca leucadendron

M. quinquinervia C

Medium Canopy (to 10 - 12 metres) (Nature strips 1.5 - 3 metres)

Exotic

Acer cultivars

Carpinus cultivars

Catalpa bignonioides

Celtis occidentalis UP

Cinnamomum camphora UP

Fraxinus excelsior 'Aurea' UP

Gleditsia cultivars

Koelreuteria paniculata

Liquidambar styraciflua UP

Liquidambar formosana

Metrosideros excelsor C

Tilia cordata cultivars

Pyrus cultivars

Ulmu sparvifolia UP

Native

Acacia decurrens

A. mearnsii

A. pendula

Allocasuarina torulosa C

Agonis flexuosa - UP

Banksia integrifolia I C

B. serrata C

Eucalyptus cephalocarpa

E. cinera

E. cornuta C

E. crenulata

E. ficifolia C

E. largiflorens

E. leucoxylon var. megalocarpa UP C

E. mannifera ssp. maculosa

E. nicholii UP

E. ovata I C

E. pauciflora I

E. pryoriana I C

E. pulchella

E. radiata

E. salubris

E. scoparia

E. sideroxylon 'Rosea' C

E. species

Ficus hilli

Lophostemon confertus UP

Tristaniopsis laurina

Waterhousia floribunda

Small Canopy (to 8 metres NOT REQUIRING POWERLINE CLEARANCE)

(Nature strips up to 1.5 metres)

Exotic

Acer cultivars

Calodendru capense

Cercis cultivars C

Koelreuteriapanic lata

Lagerstroemia indica cultivars

Malus cultivars

Olea europea C

Pistacia sinensis

Prunus cultivars

Robinia cultivars

Native

Acacia acuminata

A. cognata

A. implexa I

A. podalrifolia C

A. pycnantha C

Acmena smithii

Allocasuarina torulosa C

A. verticillata I C

Angophora hispida C

Banksia marginata C

B. prionotes C

B. serrata C

Brachychiton rupestris

Callistemon 'Dawson River Weeper’

C. 'Harkness' C

C. salignus C

C. viminalis C

Eucalyptus erythrocorys C

E. forestiana

E. spathulata

E. steedmani

E. torquata

E. woodwardii

E. species

Griselina littoralis C

Hakea corriacea C

Hakea species C

Leptospermum laevigatum I C

L. species

Melia azedarach

Melaleuca bracteata

M. linariifolia C

M. quinquenervia

Persoonia pinifolia

 

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